Location | Roma
Date | 2017
Client | Consorzio Stabile Seaman
Design | Andrea Lupacchini

With Typo and Linea, the MAXXI Museum ( National Museum of XXI Centuryin Rome) is enriched by two large reception areas where food and hospitality merge, offering visitors places where to drink coffee or take a break, where to read art books and where to work. The Interiors project, developed by Andrea Lupacchini (the architect already known for successful projects in food design, the latest of which the new Romeo) is joined by the food consultancy of chef Cristina Bowerman for Consorzio Stabile Seaman and expresses at its best the contemporary character of stylistic choices and taste.

Typo is the coffee shop-bookshop that, placing itself in the connecting area between the museum foyer and via Guido Reni, creates a new direct access to the MAXXI from the street. The interiors, curated by Devoto Design, are characterized by Corian® furniture with a polygonal pattern that designs the environment by celebrating the concept of fluid space defined by the project of Zaha Hadid. The place is characterized by numerous suspended circular elements that create a dynamic sky for this space and which, together with the three-dimensional texture on the walls, contribute to acoustic comfort.

Linea, a place with a declared food vocation, is spread over two levels and also includes an outdoor dehor that allows Linea to accommodate 250 guests at the same time. Large pieces of furniture in white Corian® seem to be suspended and flank benches with polygonal shapes in white painted steel. The insertion of mobile display walls gives the possibility to change the layout of the room giving flexibility with respect to the functions and events to be planned. The acoustic comfort, also in this case, is given through the use of  elements that also define the architectural character of this place: 3D elements in pvc foam suspended from the roof and fixed to the walls generate a dynamic rhythm in a perfect MAXXI style.

Photo Credit: Nicolò Sardo, courtesy of Andrea Lupacchini